How to Make Japanese Rice with Rice Cooker

How To Make Rice

Here are the simple instructions on how to make Japanese rice at home with a rice cooker.

For stovetop cooking method (not using a rice cooker), click here.

If you need to make Sushi Rice (seasoned with sushi vinegar seasoning) to make sushi, click here to get the recipe.

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How To Make Rice
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Serves: 9 cooked cups
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Put rice in a large bowl. Rinse the rice and discard the water immediately. Rice absorbs water very quickly when you start washing, so don't let the rice absorb the unclear water. Repeat this process 1-2 times.
  2. Now use your fingers to gently wash the rice in a circular motion.
  3. Rinse and discard water. Repeat this process 3-4 times.
  4. Let the rice soak in water for 30 minutes. Transfer the rice into a sieve and drain for 15 minutes.
  5. Now transfer the rice into the rice cooker bowl. Add cold water (good water) to 3 cups for "White Rice". And then start cooking (I use "Softer" option for our liking).
  6. Once the rice is done cooking, let it steam for another 10 minutes. Fluff the rice with a rice paddle.
Notes
We use this rice cooker.

A rice cooker cup is not same as 1 US cup. 1 rice cooker cup is 180 ml.

Recipe by Namiko Chen of Just One Cookbook. All images and content on this site are copyright protected. Please do not use my images without my permission. If you’d like to share this recipe on your site, please re-write the recipe in your own words and link to this post as the original source. Thank you.

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    • Hi Motty! I’m planning to make a post soon but haven’t had the chance to photograph step-by-step yet. Will work on it soon. Thanks for asking! :)

      4
  1. Dora

    Hi Nami,

    Is there a reason why you specifically said to not wash the rice in rice cooker’s bowl? My hubby loves to do this because it saves him one less bowl to wash after dinner.

    5
    • Hi Dora! It’s recommended not to do that. The rice cooker bowl nowadays are very expensive and may get scratches while you are washing/handling and coating may come off. Usually rice cooker company sells the bowl for replacemenet, but it is very expensive, so it’s recommended to keep it just for cooking. Also you need to drain in a sieve, so you don’t really need the rice cooker bowl until later on. Hope that helps. :)

      6
  2. Probo aditya

    Dear nami,

    Could you share to me, how much water ,which poured into ricecooker, is good to make rice for sushi or bento, because i watched some video, they showed that different cuisine had different quantity of water

    Thank you

    7
    • Hi Probo! If you’re using a Japanese rice cooker, please follow the water mark inside the rice cooker bowl. You also need to use short grain rice as that’s the “Japanese rice”. :)

      For sushi rice (which use ONLY to make sushi), we usually keep the water amount less than the regular steamed rice because we put liquid seasonings (sushi vinegar) after rice is cooked. If you put regular amount of water, it’ll be too soggy. So we cook the rice sort of al dente.

      For bento or regular steamed rice, please follow the water mark for the rice cooker. I don’t really cook other types of rice so it’s hard for me to tell the difference… I think we put more rice for short grain rice?! Please adjust the amount of water depending on the type of rice, instead of cuisine. :)

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