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Nikuman (Steamed Pork Buns) 肉まん

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    Today’s recipe I’ll teach you how to make Nikuman, Japanese steamed buns filled with delicious pork, shiitake mushroom, cabbage, and scallion. It’s the best kind of savory snack. 

    A blue dish containing Steamed Pork Buns (Nikuman).

    Do you have any food that evokes a special memory of your life? One of my dearest memories is snacking on a warm steamed bun called Nikuman during my commute home from college in the cold months. For me, Nikuman (肉まん), or Japanese-style Steamed Pork Bun, was not only my favorite winter snack but also a taste of nostalgia.

    I used to stop by a convenience store for my Nikuman treat; the steaming hot bun kept my hands and heart warm. By the way, Japanese convenience stores sell not only snacks and drinks, but a dizzying array of items like a mini supermarket. If you visit Japan, it’s definitely one place you should take a peek inside – it’s literally a “convenient” store.

    Watch How To Make Nikuman (Steamed Pork Buns)

    Learn how to make Nikuman (Japanese Steamed Pork Buns) at home! These soft fluffy buns are filled with savory juicy pork, shiitake mushroom, cabbage, and scallion. 

    What is Nikuman (肉まん)?

    Nikuman is the Japanese name for the Chinese baozi (包子,肉包), also known as Chūka Man (中華まん). These steamed buns are made from flour dough and filled with meat and other ingredients. In western Japan (西日本) including Osaka, they are called Buta Man (豚まん).

    The savory buns are usually steamed inside the bamboo steamer and taste the best when you enjoy them right out hot and fluffy. The texture of the buns is tenderly soft and moist, and when you take a bite, the inside is bursting with sweet-savory, juicy meat mixtures.

    During the winter months in Japan, convenience stores sell hot steaming chūka man including Nikuman, Kare–man (curry flavor), An-man (with red bean paste), and Pizza-man (pizza flavor).

    Yokohama, Japan’s 2nd largest city I grew up in, has the largest Chinatown and I just loved walking around to see the traditional Chinese steamed buns that are as big as my face being sold at the stores. Or at least that’s how I remembered as a small child.

    A blue dish containing Steamed Pork Buns (Nikuman).

    Homemade Nikuman

    My mom used to buy packaged steamed buns from the store and they tasted pretty good as I remembered. I never thought this dish is something we could make at home until I visited my high school friend’s house for lunch years ago.

    She made homemade nikuman for us and I was very impressed that she made the pork buns from scratch. To my surprise, she told me that they are very easy to make.  The buns were so good as they were freshly made and everyone loved them.  Since then I started to make my own and my family simply can’t get enough, especially my daughter who loves the soft white steamed buns.

    A mini bamboo steamer containing Steamed Pork Buns (Nikuman).

    You might wonder if it’s really worth your time to make the steamed buns at home, especially if you can just buy pre-packaged stuff from the grocery stores. But, let me tell you why you’ll love the homemade buns:

    Why Make Nikuman at Home:

    • Healthier – Prepackaged steamed buns tend to have additives or less ideal ingredients. It’s different when you make the buns from scratch.
    • Customization – Don’t like pork? Then use your favorite ingredients for the fillings. Make it vegetarian or vegan. These steamed buns are for YOU! I like to make them in two sizes, big ones for the adults and small ones (like today’s recipe) for the kids.
    • An approachable recipe – I was so glad when I discovered how easy it was to make my own steamed buns. Watch my video, and follow the step-by-step instructions. You’ll see how easy and straightforward the recipe is.
    • Taste fresh and delicious – Nothing is better than food made fresh, right in your own kitchen. Steamed buns are definitely one of those dishes. These nikuman are so fresh tasting and satisfying!
    • Freezer-friendly – Leftovers can be kept frozen and reheated easily to enjoy later.

    Making these steamed buns do pose some small challenges, but nothing too hard to stop anyone from giving the recipe a try!

    The Challenges:

    • Requires some timeYou have to let the dough rest and it’s necessary for good steamed buns.
    • Wrapping & folding technique – Making the steamed buns look good will require a little practice. BUT don’t worry. I’ll show you an EASY  METHOD in the recipe (Step 18) and in my video tutorial, so you can follow along with confidence.

    Folding the dumplings.

    Mastering The Folding & Pleating for Steamed Pork Buns

    This is the part that intimidates people most. For many years, I folded the dough with the EASY METHOD I shared in my recipe (Step 18). My Nikuman tasted great, but the look could be better.

    When my friend Maggie of Ominivore’s Cookbook shared her Kimchi Pork Steamed Bun recipe, she showed her mom’s technique of folding and pleating in her youtube video. Since then, I’ve been wrapping my nikuman the same way. I still need to perfect my skill, but I’ve seen huge improvements with the method.

    So I leave it up to you on how you want to wrap the dough. The nikuman taste great either way. Meanwhile, I’ll keep practicing my folding and pleating!

    PS: If you enjoyed these steamed pork buns, I think you ought to check out Shumai and Manju too!

    A blue dish containing Steamed Pork Buns (Nikuman).

    Japanese Ingredient Substitution: If you want to look for substitutes for Japanese condiments and ingredients, click here.

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    4.62 from 60 votes
    A mini bamboo steamer containing Steamed Pork Buns (Nikuman).
    Nikuman (Steamed Pork Buns)
    Prep Time
    1 hr
    Cook Time
    10 mins
    Total Time
    2 hrs 40 mins
     

    Nikuman is Japanese steamed buns filled with delicious savory pork, shiitake mushroom, cabbage, and scallion. Learn how to make this favorite snack at home!

    Course: Appetizer, Main Course, Snack
    Cuisine: Japanese
    Keyword: pork bun, steam bun
    Servings: 20 small buns
    Author: Namiko Chen
    Ingredients
    For the dough
    • 11 oz all-purpose flour (plain flour) (300 g plus more for dusting; See Notes 1)
    • 2 scant Tbsp sugar (20 g; See Notes 2)
    • ½ tsp kosher/sea salt (I use Diamond Crystal; Use half for table salt)
    • 1 tsp baking powder
    • 1 tsp instant yeast
    • 1 Tbsp neutral-flavored oil (vegetable, canola, etc)
    • 160-170 ml water (See Notes 3)
    For the filling
    Instructions
    1. Gather all the ingredients.

      Nikuman Ingredients
    2. Put 11 oz flour, scant 2 Tbsp. sugar, ½ tsp. salt, 1 tsp. baking powder, 1 tsp. instant dry yeast and 1 Tbsp. oil in a large bowl. While mixing the mixture with chopsticks or a wooden spoon, slowly pour 160-170 ml water into the mixture and mix until incorporated.

      Nikuman 1
    3. Lightly dust your hand with flour to keep the dough from sticking too much. Use your hand to knead the dough, pressing it down and reshaping it. Form it into a ball.

      Nikuman 2
    4. Sprinkle the working surface with flour. Transfer the dough onto the surface and start kneading. This is how I knead. First, press the top half of the dough, pushing forward slightly. Then pull it back and fold it in half and press it forward again with the heel of your hand twice. Then turn the dough slightly and repeat this process for 10-15 minutes or until the dough becomes smooth and silky. Sprinkle the dough with a little bit of flour at a time to help decrease the stickiness.

      Nikuman 3
    5. Form the dough into a smooth, round shape, gently tucking loose ends underneath. Coat the bottom of the bowl with oil and place the dough in the bowl. Cover it with plastic wrap and put it in a warm place until the dough doubles in size, about 30-60 minutes.

      Nikuman 4
    6. While you’re waiting for the dough to rise, make the filling. First, soak the dried shiitake mushrooms in ½ cup water. Place something heavy on top so the whole shiitake will be submerged. Set aside for 10-15 minutes.

      Nikuman 5
    7. Thinly slice the scallion. Remove the tough core of the cabbage and chop into 1” (2.5 cm) pieces.

      Nikuman 6
    8. Sprinkle the chopped cabbage with 1 tsp. salt to draw out excess water.
      Nikuman 7
    9. Once shiitake mushrooms are hydrated, squeeze the liquid out, cut off the tough stem, and mince the mushroom tops.

      Nikuman 8
    10. In a large bowl, combine ground pork, scallion, and shiitake mushrooms. Squeeze the excess water out from the cabbage with your hands and add it into the bowl.

      Nikuman 9
    11. Grate ginger and add all the seasonings (1 tsp. sugar, 1 Tbsp. sake, 1 Tbsp. soy sauce, 1 Tbsp. sesame oil, 1 Tbsp. potato/corn starch, and freshly ground black pepper).

      Nikuman 10
    12. Knead the mixture well until it is well combined and looks pale and sticky. Set aside (or cover with plastic wrap and keep in the fridge) until the dough is ready.
      Nikuman 11
    13. Once the dough has doubled in size, dust the working surface with flour and divide the dough in half and then roll each piece of dough into a log. Cut each log into 5 even pieces and then cut each piece in half (See Note 4). Form each piece of dough into a ball and dust the dough balls with flour to avoid sticking to each other. Space each ball apart and cover loosely with a damp kitchen cloth to avoid drying out. Let them rest for 10 minutes.

      Nikuman 12
    14. Take a ball of dough and flatten it with your palm. Then roll it with a rolling pin into a round sheet. Here’s how I roll the dough. Hold the top of the dough with the left hand and use a rolling pin to roll out the dough with the right hand. You only need to roll up and down on the bottom half of the dough. After rolling 1-2 times, rotate the dough about 30 degrees with the left hand. Repeat this process until the dough becomes thin. The center of dough should be thicker than the edge.

      Nikuman 13
    15. Scoop 1½ Tbsp of filling (with a 1½ Tbsp. cookie scoop) and place in the center of the dough.
      Nikuman 14
    16. Hold the dough with the left hand and seal the bun using the right index finger and thumb. First, pick up a corner of the dough with your right index finger and thumb and pinch together (left picture). Without moving your thumb, use your right index finger to pick up the dough and pinch it with your thumb while rotating the dough clockwise with your left hand (right picture).

      Nikuman 15
    17. Repeat this process about 10-12 times (=10-12 pleats) until you seal the last part of the dough by pinching it tightly. Here are some tips: your left thumb should hold down the filling and use your left fingers to turn around the wrapper. Use your left index finger to help to pleat. Also, lift up the pinched pleats slightly while you make the new pleat so the filling stays inside the dough.

      Nikuman 16
    18. Once you finish sealing the last part of the dough, twist the pleats further with your right index finger and thumb to maintain a tight seal. If you’re left-handed, reverse the directions.

      Nikuman 17
    19. Easy Alternative Option: Wrap the filling by bringing the dough up around the meat to the top, forming little pleats with the excess dough, then slightly twisting the dough to close it and pinching it firmly to join the edges.
      Nikuman 18
    20. Place the bun on a piece of parchment paper that fits the bun (for small size, 3” x 3”). Cover the finished buns with plastic wrap and repeat this process with the rest of the dough. Let the buns rest for 20 minutes.

      Nikuman 19
    21. Bring water to boil and set a steamer. Once the water is boiling, place the buns and parchment paper in the steamer tray leaving about 2” between each bun (buns will get larger while being steamed). Close the lid and steam over high heat for 10 minutes (10 for small buns, 13 for medium, 15 for big). If you use a regular pot for steaming, wrap the lid with a kitchen cloth to prevent the condensation (formed on the lid) from dripping onto the buns. Enjoy immediately.

      Nikuman 20
    22. The buns keep well in the fridge till the next day and freeze well after steaming. Wrap them in plastic wrap and then pack them in freezer bags (I suggest to consume in 1 week). To reheat, steam frozen buns for a couple of minutes.

    Recipe Notes

    1: 300 g (10.6 oz) all-purpose flour = ROUGHLY 2 1/3 cups.

     

    2: “Scant” 2 Tbsp. means “just barely” 2 Tbsp. Don’t fill the Tbsp. to the top and use slightly less than the required amount. (2 Tbsp. of granulated sugar is 25 grams, but we only need 20 grams.)

     

    3: Start with 160 gram/ml of water first. Depending on the weather, you might need more.

     

    4: You can divide into less pieces of dough to make bigger buns. It's also easier to work with smaller dough to make nice pleats when you wrap because it's hard to hold a big dough and filling in one hand.

     

    Recipe by Namiko Chen of Just One Cookbook. All images and content on this site are copyright protected. Please do not use my images without my permission. If you’d like to share this recipe on your site, please re-write the recipe in your own words and link to this post as the original source. Thank you.

    Similar Savory and Sweet Treats You’ll Enjoy:

    Editor’s Note: This post was originally published on Mar 16, 2015. It’s been edited and republished in April 2020.

     

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