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Japanese Spinach Salad with Sesame Dressing (Horenso Gomaae) ほうれん草の胡麻和え

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    Blanched spinach dressed in a savory nutty sesame sauce, this Japanese Spinach Salad with Sesame Dressing (Spinach Gomaae) is a healthy veggie side dish that goes well with everything.

    Japanese spinach salad in savory sesame dressing served in a bowl.

    Spinach or green beans are often dressed in sesame sauce in Japanese cuisine. We call this dish “Goma-ae (胡麻和え)”. Sweet and savory sesame sauce made with freshly ground sesame seeds adds rich and nutty flavors to refreshing blanched green vegetables.

    What Does Gomaae Mean?

    Goma (胡麻) in Japanese means sesame seed and goma-ae (胡麻和え) is a dish that’s dressed with the sesame sauce. The word ae (pronounced as [ah EH]. 和え) comes from the verb aeru ([ah EH loo]. 和える) which is to dress (the food with sauce).

    Japanese spinach salad in savory sesame dressing served in a bowl.

    Spinach Gomaae as Easy Side Dish

    Spinach gomaae is one of the most popular side dishes, or as we call Osozai (お惣菜), in Japan.

    It’s extremely easy and quick to make, and it compliments well with any Japanese foods. Not to mention, it is often added to a bento lunch giving a nice appetizing green color to the meal.

    Japanese spinach salad in savory sesame dressing served in a bowl.

    Freshly Toasted & Ground Sesame Seeds

    Sesame seeds add a nutty taste and a delicate crunch to the dish. If you have time, I highly recommend toasting the sesame seeds (even for roasted sesame seeds) in a frying pan just for a few minutes (no oil needed). This simple step brings out the wonderful aroma of sesame seeds and toasty flavors.

    Once the sesame seeds are nicely toasted, grind them in a Japanese mortar and pestle. You will be immediately surrounded by the fragrant roasted sesame smell!

    Japanese grocery stores sell convenient crushed/ground sesame seeds in a package, but the fragrance and flavors won’t be the same.

    Japanese Mortar and Pestle.

    Japanese Mortar & Pestle for Gomaae

    For Japanese cooking, we make gomaae frequently enough that each household usually owns Japanese mortar and pestle to crush sesame seeds as well as for various pastes.

    • The Mortar (Suribachi): It’s an earthenware bowl and the inside has a ridged pattern to facilitate grinding.
    • The Pestle (Surikogi): It’s usually made of wood so that it prevents from wearing down the ridges in the mortar.

    I’ve been using a small Suribachi since my college days, but I think it’s time to upgrade to a bigger one so that I can add the blanched spinach directly into the Suribachi, instead of transferring the sesame sauce to a bigger bowl. If you cook for the family, I recommend getting at least a medium-size Suribachi. You can purchase Japanese mortar and pestle on Amazon.

    Watch How To Make Japanese Spinach Salad (Gomaae)

    Japanese spinach salad (Spinach Gomaae) is a delicious and refreshing side dish prepared with blanched spinach dressed in savory nutty sesame sauce.

    Japanese Ingredient Substitution: If you want to look for substitutes for Japanese condiments and ingredients, click here.

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    4.65 from 64 votes
    Japanese spinach salad dressed in sesame sauce served in a bowl
    Japanese Spinach Salad with Sesame Dressing (Horenso Gomaae)
    Prep Time
    10 mins
    Cook Time
    5 mins
    Total Time
    15 mins
     
    Blanched spinach dressed in a savory nutty sesame sauce, this Japanese Spinach Salad with Sesame Dressing (Spinach Gomaae) is a healthy veggie side dish that goes well with everything.
    Course: Salad, Side Dish
    Cuisine: Japanese
    Keyword: aemono, gomaae, spinach salad
    Servings: 4
    Author: Namiko Chen
    Ingredients
    • ½ lb spinach (227 g)
    • pinch kosher/sea salt (I use Diamond Crystal; Use half for table salt)
    Sesame Sauce
    • 3 Tbsp toasted white sesame seeds (25 g)
    • 1 ½ Tbsp soy sauce (reduce to 1 Tbsp if you skip sake and mirin)
    • 1 Tbsp sugar
    • ½ tsp sake (skip if serving this dish for children)
    • ½ tsp mirin (skip if serving this dish for children)
    Instructions
    1. Gather all the ingredients.

      Spinach Gomaae Ingredients
    2. [Optional] For the sesame sauce, put sesame seeds in a frying pan and toast them on low heat. When 2-3 sesame seeds start to pop from the pan, remove from the heat.

      Spinach Gomaae 2
    3. Grind the toasted sesame seeds with a mortar and pestle. Leave some sesame seeds unground for some texture.
      Spinach Gomaae 1
    4. Add 1 ½ Tbsp soy sauce, 1 Tbsp sugar, ½ tsp sake, ½ tsp mirin to the ground sesame seeds and mix all together.

      Spinach Gomaae 2
    5. Put lightly salted water in a large pot and bring to boil. Once boiling, add the spinach from the stem side (takes longer to cook) and cook for 30-45 seconds.

      Spinach Gomaae 3
    6. Remove the spinach from the water and soak in iced water to stop cooking with remaining heat. Alternatively, drain and run the spinach under cold running water until cool. Collect the spinach and squeeze water out.

      Spinach Gomaae 4
    7. Cut the spinach into 1-2” (2.5-5 cm) lengths and put in a medium bowl.

      Spinach Gomaae 5
    8. Add the sesame sauce and toss it all together. Serve at room temperature or chilled.

      Spinach Gomaae 6
    To Store
    1. You can keep in the refrigerator for 2-3 days or freezer for 2-4 weeks.

    Recipe Notes

    Spinach: American spinach is very soft and we can eat it raw unlike Japanese spinach; therefore, cooking for 30-45 seconds is enough.

    Recipe by Namiko Chen of Just One Cookbook. All images and content on this site are copyright protected. Please do not use my images without my permission. If you’d like to share this recipe on your site, please re-write the recipe in your own words and link to this post as the original source. Thank you.

    Editor’s Note: The post was originally published on March 30, 2011. The video and new pictures were added in June 2016.

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