Miso Ginger Pork 味噌生姜焼き

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  • With umami-rich miso, savory soy sauce, spicy ginger, and a hint of sweet mirin, Miso Ginger Pork is a perfect mix of delicious Japanese flavors. Serve with steamed rice to enjoy this popular Japanese dish!

    A white plate containing thinly sliced Miso Ginger Pork served with shredded cabbage, sliced cucumbers, and cherry tomatoes.

    When you start cooking Japanese food at home, you will quickly learn that there are five essential condiments. Today’s Miso Ginger Pork (味噌しょうが焼き) uses four of them: soy sauce, mirin, sake, and miso (leaving out rice vinegar). If you already love ginger pork, this Miso Ginger Pork takes the dish to the next level of deliciousness!

    Tired of Ginger Pork?  Try Miso Ginger Pork 

    I often receive emails and messages from readers that they don’t know what to do with the remaining miso that has been sitting at the back of their refrigerator. They often buy a tub of miso to cook with just one or two dishes and end up not knowing what else to do with it.

    Well, my quick response would be to make Miso Soup every time you serve Japanese dish with steamed rice. But if you are looking for more ideas, my next suggestion is to use miso to season meat and fish. You’ll be surprised at the depth of flavor that miso adds to everything you stir it into.

    A white plate containing thinly sliced Miso Ginger Pork served with shredded cabbage, sliced cucumbers, and cherry tomatoes.

    The typical Ginger pork, or Shogayaki in Japanese, is composed of thinly sliced pork (pork loin cut) sautéed with ginger, soy sauce, mirin, and sake. It is one of my favorite go-to dishes as I love the combination of all these flavors. It is also super easy to pull together, guaranteed to hit the dinner table in about 15 minutes.

    If you have a tub of miso in your refrigerator right now, you can utilize this all-purpose ingredient by incorporating with the rest of seasonings for Miso Ginger Pork. Just a spoonful is all it takes to make the classic home cooked dish extra special.

    Bear in mind that miso can burn easily, so I don’t recommend marinating the meat for this dish. Make sure the pork is cooked through first, before you pour in the sauce.

    A white plate containing thinly sliced Miso Ginger Pork served with shredded cabbage, sliced cucumbers, and cherry tomatoes.

    Use Hikari Miso® Organic Miso to Make Miso Ginger Pork

    New to Japanese condiments and not sure what brand of miso to buy? My recommendation is Hikari Miso. I wish someone told me about this brand when I first came to the U.S. Instead, I’ve purchased, tasted and tested different brands of miso that were available in my local Japanese grocery stores for several years until I finally discovered Hikari Miso. It is undeniably my favorite go-to brand when comes to miso paste.  So, I hope I could save you some time.

    Hikari Miso - Organic Miso Series

    Click here to read more about miso.

    This post is sponsored by Hikari Miso and I’m really excited that I’m partnering with a company with products that I strongly believe in. I’ve been using their miso every day for almost a decade and I cannot speak any more favorably for their miso pastes.

    For this Miso Ginger Pork recipe, I’ve used Hikari Miso Organic Miso (White Miso). White miso is the most common paste in the U.S., and its mild flavor pairs well with any dishes and soups. If you have other types of miso – like red or dashi miso – you can still use what you have for today’s recipe.

    A white plate containing thinly sliced Miso Ginger Pork served with shredded cabbage, sliced cucumbers, and cherry tomatoes.

    Helpful Tips and Substitutes to Make Miso Ginger Pork

    With some planning, this Miso Ginger Pork could be your reliable dinner option. If you prepared steamed rice, miso soup, shredded cabbage (or any type of salad) ahead of time, you can put together this dish in 15 minutes, or even less.

    Even though it’s such a simple dish to make, here are some tips and substitute information which I hope it’s helpful for you:

    1. Miso gets burnt easily.

    It’s always good to remember this. Like honey, miso almost always burns easily in the heat. Therefore, I do not recommend adding miso in the marinade for this dish. But if you really want to add miso in the marinade, make sure to remove/wipe off the marinade completely before you pan fry.

    2. Use thinly sliced meat.

    For this dish,  you want to use thinly sliced meat so the flavors soak through the meat just fine without marinating. It can be pork loin or pork belly, whichever you can get. Japanese, Korean, and Chinese grocery stores carry thinly sliced meat, but if you can’t find them at your local store, you can cut the meat thinly yourself.

    3. Substitute for Pork/Sake/Mirin

    Although this classic dish uses pork, you can use other protein choices or vegetables. Chicken, beef, shrimp, mushrooms, or eggplants are just some of the examples that would go well with the sauce.

    In regards to sake and mirin substitutions, you want to read this post for detailed information.

    A white plate containing thinly sliced Miso Ginger Pork served with shredded cabbage, sliced cucumbers, and cherry tomatoes.

    To enjoy the juicy, succulent piece of miso-glazed ginger pork, serve it with steamed rice and some shredded cabbage, cucumber and tomatoes. Okawari (another serving) is guaranteed!

    A white plate containing thinly sliced Miso Ginger Pork served with shredded cabbage, sliced cucumbers, and cherry tomatoes.

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    5 from 1 vote
    A white plate containing thinly sliced Miso Ginger Pork served with shredded cabbage, sliced cucumbers, and cherry tomatoes.
    Miso Ginger Pork
    Prep Time
    20 mins
    Cook Time
    10 mins
    Total Time
    30 mins
     
    With umami-rich miso, savory soy sauce, spicy ginger, and a hint of sweet mirin, Miso Ginger Pork is a perfect mix of delicious Japanese flavors. Serve with steamed rice to enjoy this popular Japanese dish!
    Course: Main Course
    Cuisine: Japanese
    Keyword: ginger pork, miso
    Servings: 2
    Ingredients
    Marinade
    • 2 inch ginger (5 cm)(Separate juice and grated ginger)
    • 1 Tbsp sake
    • ½ Tbsp soy sauce
    Seasonings
    To Serve (Optional)
    • ¼ cabbage (small cabbage head)
    • ¼ cucumber
    • 6 cherry tomatoes
    Instructions
    1. Gather all the ingredients.
      Ginger Pork Ingredients
    2. Grate ginger and squeeze the juice out. Save 1 tsp grated ginger for later use. Put only ginger juice in a container that you will marinate the pork with.

      Miso Ginger Pork 1
    3. Add 1 Tbsp sake and ½ Tbsp soy sauce. Then add the sliced pork.
      Miso Ginger Pork 2
    4. Flip and coat the pork with the marinade. Set aside.
      Miso Ginger Pork 3
    5. In a small bowl, combine ingredients for the seasoning: 1 Tbsp soy sauce, 1 Tbsp sake, 1 Tbsp mirin, 1 Tbsp miso, and 1 tsp sugar.

      Miso Ginger Pork 4
    6. And add 1 tsp grated ginger and mix well. Set aside.
      Miso Ginger Pork 5
    7. Heat the oil in the large frying pan over medium to medium-high heat. Add and sear the meat in a single layer. To give a nice even sear, it’s best not to touch or move the meat around. 

      Miso Ginger Pork 8
    8. Flip the meat and cook the other side until no longer pink. Then add the seasonings.

      Miso Ginger Pork 6
    9. Coat the meat with sauce using a spoon and flip once to make sure the meat is seasoned on both sides. Serve immediately.

      Miso Ginger Pork 7
    Recipe Notes

    Recipe by Namiko Chen of Just One Cookbook. All images and content on this site are copyright protected. Please do not use my images without my permission. If you’d like to share this recipe on your site, please re-write the recipe and link to this post as the original source. Thank you.

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