Yeast

  • Both Active Dry Yeast and Instant Yeast help leaven bread and provide an airy, light texture. Here’s what you need to know about these yeasts!

    Quick Rise Yeast | Easy Japanese Recipes at JustOneCookbook.com

    Learn About Yeasts

    Both Active Dry Yeast and Instant Yeast help leaven bread and provide an airy, light texture. The most important thing to remember is:

    Active dry yeast needs to be dissolved in water before using, while instant yeast can be mixed right into dry ingredients.

    1. Active Dry Yeast

    Active Dry Yeast is the most common type of dry yeast and it’s granular with a similar consistency to cornmeal. It’s a living organism that’s dormant until dissolved in a small amount of lukewarm warm water (about 110°F). It’s then added to the rest of the ingredients, where it causes the dough to rise.

    Active dry yeast is typically sold in individual packets or small jars. If using the latter, just make sure to refrigerate it after opening so the yeast stays fresh and active.

    2. Instant Yeast (Rapid- or Quick-Rise) – The yeast that I use in my recipes

    This is what I use in my recipes. Instant yeast is a type of dry yeast and it dissolves and activates faster. The yeast has been milled into smaller particles so it doesn’t need to be dissolved into water. In addition, enzymes and other additives are included to make the dough rise faster.

    With this yeast, you can skip the first rise of the dough and shape the loaves right after kneading. It’s great for quick baking projects and saves time by skipping multiple rises.

    Homemade glazed and matcha glazed pon de ring donuts on a wire rack.

    Pon de Ring Donuts

    How To Use Instant Yeast

    Unlike active dry yeast, instant yeast doesn’t have to be proofed first; it can be mixed straight into the dry ingredients with the same result.

    Substitute Active Dry Yeast for Instant Yeast

    I use Instant Yeast and you may wonder if you can use Active Dry Yeast.

    Active dry yeast and instant yeast can generally be used interchangeably, one-for-one.

    Since active dry yeast may be slower to rise, if a recipe calls for instant yeast and you use active dry yeast instead, you may want to add an extra 10 to 15 minutes for the rise time.

    Melon Pan (メロンパン) | Easy Japanese Recipes at JustOneCookbook.com

    Melon Pan

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