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Anko (Red Bean Paste)

  • Koshian (fine red bean paste) and Tsubuan (chunky red bean paste).

    Anko (餡子,あんこ), or sometimes we call it An (餡, あん), is sweet red bean paste made from azuki beans. It’s one of the basic and most important ingredients for wagashi (Japanese confectioneries).


    4 Types of Red Bean Paste

    1. Chunky Red Bean Paste – Tsubu-an (つぶ餡, つぶあん)

    When azuki beans are cooked until soft and the mixture is not pureed and there are still whole beans left, it’s considered Tsubu-an (つぶあん). Because the beans are still chunky, this type of red bean paste is a great filling for sweets like Strawberry Daifuku, DorayakiDaifuku, Taiyaki, and etc.

    Tsubuan Red Bean Paste | Easy Japanese Recipes at JustOneCookbook
    Store-bought Tsubu-an.

    If you would like to make a homemade recipe, please scroll down.

    2. Fine Red Bean Paste – Koshi-an (こし餡, こしあん)

    Koshi-An (こしあん) is very smooth, pureed azuki beans where the beans are cooked until soft and passed through a sieve to get the finest texture without the skins.  The package looks like this.

    Anko (Koshian)
    Store-bought Koshi-an.

    If you would like to make a homemade recipe, please scroll down.

    3. Tsubushi-An (つぶし餡)

    It’s between Tsubu-an and Koshi-an, where some of the Azuki beans are mashed but the skins are included.

    4. Ogura-An (小倉あん)

    Traditionally, Ogura-an (小倉あん) was made with Koshi-an that’s mixed with Tsubuan and cooked in sweet syrup. For Tsubu-an, Dainagon Azuki Beans (大納言小豆), the highest quality of azuki beans, are used.

    Ogura An

    However, in recent years, Ogura-an is basically just Tsubu-an.


    How to Make Red Bean Paste (Anko) from Scratch

    Koshian (fine red bean paste) and Tsubuan (chunky red bean paste).


    How to Make Red Bean Paste (Anko) in Pressure Cooker

    Learn how to make both Tsubu-an and Koshi-an with a pressure cooker, click here for the recipe.

    Pressure Cooker Anko (Sweet Red Bean Paste) | Easy Japanese Recipes at JustOneCookbook.com


    Recipes Using Red Bean Paste (Anko)

    Mitarashi Dango and Dango with anko on a Japanese blue ceramic.

    Dango

    Sliced-in-half Strawberry Mochi (Ichigo Daifuku) on a white plate.

    Strawberry Mochi (Ichigo Daifuku)

    A lacquer box containing Ohagi (Botamochi) and some of them are served on a black plate.

    Ohagi (Botamochi) – Sweet Rice Balls

    Taiyaki served on a wooden plate.

    Taiyaki

    Japanese lacquer bowls containing red bean soup with mochi.

    Zenzai (Oshiruko) – Red Bean Soup

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