Dashi Packet (& Recipe)

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  • Dashi packet is a great alternative in making dashi (Japanese soup stock). It’s really convenient and produces much more flavorful soup stock than one made with dashi powder.

    Dashi made from Dashi Packet.

    One of the most convenient ways of making delicious dashi for your miso soup and other Japanese dishes is Dashi Packet (だしパック). In this post, I will show you my favorite dashi packet and how to use it.


    The Dashi Packet I Love

    Kayanoya Dashi Packet | Easy Japanese Recipes at JustOneCookbook.com

    After trying a handful of dashi packet brands, I believe Kayanoya Dashi has the best flavors among them.

    This dashi packet includes frying fish (Yakiago, Tobiuo), bonito flakes (katsuobushi), Pacific round herring (Urume Iwashi), kelp (Ma Kombu; see different types of kombu in this post), and sea salt. And is MSG-free and additive-free.

    One bag of Kayanoya Dashi comes with 30 packets, which can make roughly 60 miso soup bowls (if you’re using dashi for making miso soup).

    Kayanoya Dashi finally came to the U.S. and you can purchase it on Amazon or from your local Japanese grocery stores (I get mine from Nijiya). Kayanoya also carries different types of dashi, which includes low-sodium dashi and vegetable dashi.

    Yamaki Dashi Packet

    There is another brand Yamaki Dashi Packet (get it on Amazon). I used to use this brand when Kayanoya Dashi wasn’t available in my local Japanese grocery stores.


    Watch How to Make Dashi Using Dashi Packet

    To make dashi with the dashi packet, it is as simple as boiling water. Just throw a dashi packet in a pot of water to quickly infuse the flavor for 3-5 minutes.

    When you are running short on time, make dashi (Japanese soup stock) using the convenient dashi packet. It produces much more flavorful soup stock than one made with dashi powder.


    Recipes Using Dashi

    Majority of Japanese recipes require dashi to add authentic umami-rich savory flavors and here are some examples.


    5 different types of dashi in a jar and their ingredients.

    The Ultimate Dashi Guide on Just One Cookbook

    Dashi plays an important role as a flavor enhancer in Japanese cooking, so you don’t need to season the food with too much salt, fat, and sugar. Rich in minerals and other vitamins, dashi is considered a healthy ingredient in our daily diet.

    There are five different types of dashi you can use in Japanese cooking, including vegetarian and vegan dashi (*).

    1. Kombu Dashi → made from kombu (dried kelp)*
    2. Katsuo Dashi → made from katsuobushi (dried bonito flakes)
    3. Iriko Dashi → made from iriko or niboshi (dried anchovies/sardines)
    4. Shiitake Dashi → made from dried shiitake mushrooms*
    5. Awase Dashi → made from a combination of all above or two (e.g., kombu + katsuobushi)

    If you are new to different types of dashi, check out my Ultimate Dashi Guide post.

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    How to Make Dashi with Dashi Packet | Easy Japanese Recipes at JustOneCookbook.com
    How to Make Dashi with Dashi Packet
    Cook Time
    5 mins
    Total Time
    5 mins
     

    When you are running short on time, make dashi (Japanese soup stock) using the convenient dashi packet. It produces much more flavorful soup stock than one made with dashi powder.

    Course: How to
    Cuisine: Japanese
    Keyword: dashi, stock
    Servings: 430 ml (1 ⅞ cup)
    Author: Nami
    Ingredients
    Instructions
    1. In a medium saucepan, add water and dashi packet.

      Dashi Packet 1
    2. Start cooking over medium heat. After boiling, reduce the heat to medium-low heat and simmer for 3-5 minutes. Shake the bag a few times to get more flavors out of the bag.
      Dashi Packet 2
    3. Discard the packet and dashi is ready to use.
      Dashi Packet 3
    To Store
    1. You can keep the dashi in the refrigerator for up to 3-4 days. I don't recommend to freeze dashi made with dashi packet.

    Recipe Notes

    Recipe by Namiko Chen of Just One Cookbook. All images and content on this site are copyright protected. Please do not use my images without my permission. If you’d like to share this recipe on your site, please re-write the recipe and link to this post as the original source. Thank you.

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