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Mapo Tofu 麻婆豆腐

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    The Japanese-style Mapo Tofu (Mabo Dofu) is incredibly flavorful but less spicy than the Sichuan-style. A delicious meal ready in 30 minutes that even children can enjoy!

    A Japanese blue and white bowl containing Mapo Tofu over steamed rice.

    Mapo Tofu (麻婆豆腐) is Mr. JOC’s all-time favorite dish, and it frequently makes it into my dinner menu rotation.

    Since it takes less than 30 minutes to prepare, I usually cook this dish when I’m too busy to cook a more elaborate meal. We often eat Mapo Tofu as a donburi-style, one-bowl meal for easy cleanup! This is a great hearty dish to please everyone in the family.

    What is Mapo Tofu?

    Mapo Tofu is a popular Chinese dish from Sichuan province. The classic recipe consists of silken tofu, ground pork or beef, fermented broad beans & soybeans (doubanjiang), fermented black beans (douchi), and Sichuan peppercorn to name a few main ingredients.

    Tofu is cooked in a spicy and oily, chili- and bean-based sauce, which lends beautiful bright red color to the dish.

    While the original Shichuan Mapo Tofu is pretty spicy, the Japanese version is usually mild so even children can enjoy it.

    A Japanese blue and white bowl containing Mapo Tofu over steamed rice.

    Introduction of Mapo Tofu to Japan

    In Japan, Mapo Tofu is called Mabo Dofu and it’s written either as 麻婆豆腐 or マーボー豆腐 in Japanese.

    How did the dish arrive in Japan you might wonder? It was introduced to Japan in the 1970s by Chen Kenmin, a famous Chinese chef in Japan. I mentioned about Chef Chen in my previous post here. He was the culinary hero that brought many popular Chinese recipes to Chinese restaurants in Japan.

    Thanks to Chef Chen, Mapo Tofu, Ebi Chili (Chili Prawns エビチリ), and Stir-Fried Pork and Bell Peppers (Chin-jao ro-su 青椒肉絲)  are just a few widely well-known Chinese dishes in Japan.

    These dishes have been enjoyed in Japanese household for almost half a century! In Japanese grocery stores, you can find convenient ready-to-eat sauces for these popular dishes. I remember the packages were in my mom’s kitchen pantry too!

    A Japanese blue and white bowl containing Mapo Tofu over steamed rice.

    Chinese Mapo Tofu vs. Japanese Mabo Dofu

    There are many versions of Mabo Dofu within Japan and each household cooks it differently.

    The common ingredients that you may not find in classic Chinese Mapo Tofu include miso (Japanese fermented soybeans, sometimes rice and barley included), mirin or sugar, and sesame oil. Soy sauce, oyster sauce, and sake are sometimes added too.

    As I mentioned above, Japanese Mabo Dofu doesn’t include any chili or peppercorn. The only “spicy” element comes from doubanjiang, the fermented bean paste. Please note the difference between doubanjiang and la doubanjiang as the latter includes chili.

    A Japanese blue and white bowl containing Mapo Tofu over steamed rice.

    The Key Ingredients for Making Mapo Tofu

    If you never made this dish before, it might sound and look challenging to you. However, this dish can be prepared easily with typical Asian/Japanese ingredients.

    The key ingredient for Mapo Tofu (or Mabo Dofu) is Fermented Broad Beans & Soybeans called Doubanjiang (豆瓣酱), which lends a whole new dimension to the dish.

    Spicy Chili Bean Paste (Doubanjiang & La Doubanjiang) | Easy Japanese Recipes at JustOneCookbook.com

    If you have tried my Vegetarian Ramen and Miso Ramen recipes, you probably have the bean paste in your refrigerator already. The fermented beans give amazing umami; therefore, please do not substitute.

    Amazon does not sell the non-spicy broad bean paste, but you can buy a Taiwanese Lian How (岡山) brand at Asian markets or on Walmart (please let me know if you find this brand online).

    With that, the recipe is just about frying up the aromatics like ginger and garlic, ground meat with the right amount of seasonings. Heat it up until the sauce starts bubbling, then add the tofu and coat the mixture together until the flavors infuse. Now you have a one reliably satisfying rice bowl dish for the family. I hope you enjoy my Japanese Mapo Tofu!

    Watch How To Make Mapo Tofu

    Watch on YouTube

    Japanese Ingredient Substitution: If you want to look for substitutes for Japanese condiments and ingredients, click here.

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    4.7 from 96 votes
    Mapo Tofu (Mabo Dofu 麻婆豆腐) | Easy Japanese Recipes at JustOneCookbook.com
    Mapo Tofu (Mabo Dofu)
    Prep Time
    10 mins
    Cook Time
    15 mins
    Total Time
    25 mins
     

    The Japanese-style Mapo Tofu (Mabo Dofu) is incredibly flavorful but less spicy than the Sichuan-style. A delicious meal ready in 30 minutes that even children can enjoy!

    Course: Main Course
    Cuisine: Japanese
    Keyword: pork, tofu
    Servings: 4
    Author: Nami
    Ingredients
    • 2 cloves garlic
    • 1 inch ginger (2.5 cm)
    • 2 green onions/scallions
    • 14 oz silken/soft tofu (396 g)
    • 1 Tbsp neutral-flavored oil (vegetable, canola, etc)
    • ½ lb ground pork (227 g; or any other meat/veggies of your choice)
    Seasonings
    Instructions
    1. Gather all the ingredients.

      Mapo Tofu Ingredients
    2. Combine all the ingredients for Seasonings (2 ½ Tbsp Chili Bean Sauce and/or Broad Bean Paste, 2 Tbsp mirin, 1 Tbsp miso, 1 Tbsp. oyster sauce, ½ Tbsp soy sauce, 1 tsp sesame oil, 1 tsp corn starch, 4 Tbsp water) in a bowl and mix well together.

      Mapo Tofu 1
    3. Mince the garlic cloves and ginger finely.
      Mapo Tofu 2
    4. Cut the green onions into small pieces. Drain the tofu and cut into about 1 inch (2.5 cm) cubes.
      Mapo Tofu 3
    5. In a large frying pan, heat vegetable oil on medium heat and saute garlic and ginger. Make sure you don't burn them. Once they are fragrant, add the ground pork and break it up with a spatula or wooden spoon.
      Mapo Tofu 4
    6. When the meat is no longer pink, add the Seasoning mixture and stir thoroughly.
      Mapo Tofu 5
    7. Once the sauce is back to boiling, add the tofu and gently coat the tofu with the sauce. Stir frequently, without mashing up the tofu, until it is heated through. Add the green onions and mix just before taking the pan off the heat. Serve immediately.
      Mapo Tofu 6
    Recipe Notes

    Recipe by Namiko Chen of Just One Cookbook. All images and content on this site are copyright protected. Please do not use my images without my permission. If you’d like to share this recipe on your site, please re-write the recipe and link to this post as the original source. Thank you.

    Editor’s Note: The post was originally published in January 29, 2011. The video and new pictures were added to the post in May 2016. No change for the recipe.

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