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Korokke (Potato & Meat Croquette) コロッケ

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    Korokke (Japanese Potato & Meat Croquettes) are mashed potato cakes that are coated with panko and deep fried. With a golden crispy crust and creamy succulent interior, Korokke is a well-loved food in Japan! So delicious with rice and salad, or in your bento lunch. 

    Korokke, Potato and Meat Croquette on a white plate.

    In Japan, Korokke are as ubiquitous as fried chicken in convenience stores. They are tasty street food, casual diner food, specialty food, and a home-cooked dish loved by all ages. These potato and meat croquettes come with a crispy-crunchy crust that reveals a creamy, mashed potato filling. You need to try it to believe how good they are!

    Since I always have a soft spot for potato dishes and crunchy food, korokke easily tops the chart of my favorite food. I once had six pieces of these golden fried patties for one dinner. Shhh…I shouldn’t be too proud of my big appetite, but I’m absolutely excited to share my best korroke recipe with you today.

    What is Korokke (Japanese Potato & Meat Croquette)?

    Korokke is said to be originated from French croquette or Dutch kroket. I don’t speak French, but when I looked it up, I learned that croquette came from the verb croquer in French, which is to crunch. Makes total sense! Since everyone loves a good crunch, the Japanese started adapting croquette and it became a popular Japanese-western food in the early 1900s.

    At the most basic, korokke is made of a mixture of mashed potatoes, ground meat, and vegetables that have been shaped into small round patties. They are then coated in panko breadcrumbs, and deep fried until crispy.

    These days you can many versions of korokke, with a variety of additions such as ground meat, vegetables, or seafood. Some are flavored with curry powder, and some make use of leftovers from nikujaga. Another must-try flavor is kabocha croquette (my recipe). Each region of Japan also has its own korokke, featuring famous local ingredients such as shrimp, crab, or sweet corn.

    Korokke | www.justonecookbook.com

    Quick Tips for Making the Best Korokke At Home

    1. Use starchy potatoes such as russet potatoes
    2. Use quality ground beef – I used organic beef.
    3. When mashing the potatoes, leave some small chunks for textures.
    4. Discard any moisture before combining the cooked meat & vegetable mixture with the mashed potatoes
    5. Use only panko breadcrumbs for an extra crispy exterior.
    6. Lastly, always make extra because they are great for leftovers, and store well in the freezer for up to a month!

    My mom makes her Korokke without any written recipes, so over the years, I’ve developed my own version by adopting my mom’s method and personal adjustment.

    The recipe that I am sharing here includes carrots and shiitake mushrooms, which are missing from my mom’s and the regular korokke from the stores. I like to add them to give some colors and extra nutrition for the kids.

    I’ve finally got my mom’s korokke recipe in March 2012 if you’re interested. It’s good stuff so do give her recipe a try too!

    Can I Air Fry or Shallow Fry Korokke?

    The short answer is YES. I don’t own an air fryer; so I can’t provide the exact steps. However, many of my readers have tried air frying with my korokke recipe with success.

    You can also use a frying pan to shallow fry Korokke. The inside is already cooked, so all you need to do is to brown the breaded outer layer. You just need less than 1/2 inch (<1cm) oil in the pan! It’s easy for cleanup too.

    What to Serve with Japanese Croquettes

    Korokke can be enjoyed as a snack, appetizer, main, or as a featured dish in your bento lunch box. They are delicious on its own, but we also often serve it with a sweet-savory Tonkatsu sauce.

    This homemade Korokke won’t disappoint you at all!

    Korokke | www.justonecookbook.com

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    4.81 from 26 votes
    Korokke (Croquette)
    Korokke (Potato & Meat Croquette)
    Prep Time
    15 mins
    Cook Time
    1 hr 45 mins
    Total Time
    2 hrs
     

    Korokke (Japanese Potato & Meat Croquettes) are mashed potato cakes that are coated with panko and deep fried. With a golden crispy crust and creamy succulent interior, Korokke is a well-loved food in Japan! So delicious with rice and salad, or in your bento lunch. 

    Course: Main Course
    Cuisine: Japanese
    Keyword: croquette, japanese croquette, korokke, potato
    Servings: 6
    Author: Namiko Chen
    Ingredients
    • 2 lb russet potatoes (2 lb = about 4 potatoes) (peeled and halved)
    • 1 onion (finely diced)
    • ½ carrots (finely diced, optional)
    • 2 Shiitake mushrooms (optional)
    • 2 Tbsp neutral-flavored oil (vegetable, canola, etc)
    • 1 lb ground beef
    • 1 large egg (50 g w/o shell)
    • 1 tsp kosher/sea salt (I use Diamond Crystal; Use half for table salt)
    • ¼ tsp white pepper powder
    • freshly ground black pepper
    • 3 large eggs (50 g each w/o shell) (for the breading)
    • 2 cup panko (Japanese breadcrumbs)
    • ½ cup all-purpose flour (plain flour)
    • neutral-flavored oil (vegetable, canola, etc) (for deep frying)
    • Tonkatsu Sauce (See Notes for homemade recipe)
    Instructions
    1. Gather all the ingredients.

      Korokke 1
    2. In a large pot, put water and potatoes, and bring it to a boil. Cook potatoes until a skewer goes through the potato easily.

      Korokke 2
    3. Remove the potatoes from the heat and drain the water completely. When you do so, use a lid to partially cover so the potatoes don’t fall off from the pot.

    4. Move the pot back to the stove. On low heat, shift the pot so that the remaining moisture will completely evaporate (but don’t burn them).

      Korokke 4-a
    5. Turn off the heat and mash the potatoes. Unlike the typical mashed potatoes, you don’t have to mash completely. I like leaving some small chunks for texture. Set aside.

      Korokke 4-b
    6. Meanwhile, chop onion, carrot, and mushrooms finely.
      Korokke 3
    7. In a large skillet, heat oil on medium-high heat. Sauté onion until soft.

      Korokke 5-b
    8. Add carrot and Shiitake mushrooms and cook until they are soft.

      Korokke 5-d
    9. Add the meat and break it up with a wooden spoon. When the meat is cooked through, add salt, white pepper, and black pepper. Set aside.

      Korokke 5-f
    10. When both mashed potato and meat mixture are ready, add the meat mixture to the mashed potatoes in the large pot. Make sure you leave the liquid behind. We only want the dry ingredients in the pot. Discard any liquid left in the pan.

      Korokke 6-a
    11. Add an egg and mix all together until everything is well combined.

      Korokke 6-b
    12. Set aside till cool down a bit (so you can actually hold the mixture with your hands).

      Korokke 6-c
    13. While the mixture is still warm, but not hot, start making Korokke balls.

      Korokke 7
    14. Dredge each ball in flour, egg, and Panko.

      Korokke 8-a
    15. Korokke 8-b
    16. In a wok (or frying pan), heat oil over medium high heat. Deep fry Korokke until they are golden brown. The inside is already cooked, so all you need to do is to fry them until nicely brown.

      Korokke 9-a
    17. Transfer Korokke to paper towels and let the oil absorbed in the paper. Serve immediately with Tonkatsu Sauce.

      Korokke 9-b
    18. You can store the leftover in an airtight container and freeze up to a month. To reheat, put frozen or half defrosted korokke on baking sheet lined with aluminum foil or parchment paper and bake at 350F (180C) for 15 minutes or until inside is warm.
    Recipe Notes

    Tonkatsu Sauce: Homemade recipe, click here.

     

    Recipe by Namiko Chen of Just One Cookbook. All images and content on this site are copyright protected. Please do not use my images without my permission. If you’d like to share this recipe on your site, please re-write the recipe in your own words and link to this post as the original source. Thank you.

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