Sukiyaki Recipe すき焼き

Jump to Recipe Discussion
  • Cozy up at your get-together with friends and family with this homemade Japanese sukiyaki recipe, served with seared marbled beef and variety of vegetable cooked in a soy sauce broth.

    Sukiyaki in a hot pot.

    Sukiyaki (すき焼き) is a popular Japanese hot pot dish which is often cooked and served at the table, similar like Shabu Shabu (しゃぶしゃぶ).

    Watch How To Make Sukiyaki すき焼きの作り方

    Savory hot pot with seared marbled beef and variety of vegetables cooked in a soy sauce broth.

    What’s Sukiyaki?

    If you familiar with Japanese hot pot dish, you have probably heard of Shabu Shabu.  With shabu shabu, you cook thinly sliced beef and pork in a clear kombu-based broth.  The flavor is subtle and you dip the food in a ponzu or sesame based sauce.

    Sukiyaki is completely different; the food is cooked in a sweet and salty soy sauce based broth and full of bold flavors straight from the pot.

    Shabu Shabu pot and Sukiyaki pot on a table.

    Besides the broth, the pot used to cook sukiyaki is also quite different from shabu shabu.  Traditionally it is cooked in a cast iron pot while Shabu Shabu is cooked in a Japanese clay pot called donabe (土鍋), and the thinly sliced beef (but slightly thicker than shabu shabu meat) are seared first in the pot before adding ingredients and broth.

    Despite having different flavor and cooking utensil, most Sukiyaki ingredients are similar to Shabu Shabu, such as leafy vegetables, tofu, shiitake mushroom, and so on.

    Kansai Style vs. Kanto Style

    As my mom’s side of family is from Osaka (Kansai) and my dad’s side is from Tokyo (Kanto), my sukiyaki recipe is the combination of both Kansai style and Kanto style.

    In Kansai (Osaka) area, we sear the meat and season with sugar, soy sauce and sake.  Then we enjoy some of the meat first before the rest of the ingredients are added to the pot.  However in Kanto (Tokyo) area, we make Sukiyaki Sauce (Warishita, 割り下) first, and all the ingredients are cooked at the same time in the Sukiyaki Sauce.

    Sukiyaki in a pot.

    Sukiyaki Beef

    For the sliced beef, if you shop at Japanese grocery stores, look in the meat section.  There is usually pre-sliced beef, and they are specifically labeled as beef for Shabu Shabu or Sukiyaki.

    Sukiyaki Beef in a showcase.

    (photo from my Instagram)

    The Japanese likes to splurge and enjoy really good quality meat for both Sukiyaki and Shabu Shabu.  Wagyu (beef from cows raised in Japan) is very expensive ($40/lb), so typically each person only enjoys about 120-150 grams of sliced meat.

    When you shop for the meat, find well-marbled piece of meat so that fat of the meat becomes tender when you eat.  Otherwise, it’ll very chewy after being cooked.

    If you can’t find pre-sliced beef, you can try slicing the beef chunk at your home.  Follow my directions and tricks on How To Slice Meet.

    Thinly Sliced Meat on a cutting board.

    Substitutions of ingredients for Sukiyaki

    Some of ingredients we put in Sukiyaki (or Shabu Shabu) like napa cabbage and shungiku may not be easy to find in where you live.  If so, use available mushrooms and leafy vegetables such as cabbage, spinach, and bok choy.

    You can substitute Leeks and scallions/green onions for Tokyo Negi.  Instead of shirataki noodles (yam noodles), you can use vermicelli.

    Sukiyaki in a pot.

    Cooking at Dining Table

    Sukiyaki is usually cooked over a portable stove at the dining table and each person uses their own chopsticks to pick up the ingredients from the pot and add more ingredients as the food disappears from the pot.

    It’s a fun dinner for family and friends’ get-together, and not to mention, all you have to do is to chop ingredients before dinner time!

    Sukiyaki in a pot.

    How to Eat Sukiyaki the “Authentic” Way

    I am a bit hesitant and actually slightly reluctant to talk about the “authentic” way the Japanese enjoy Sukiyaki as some of you may not find it appetizing.  However, I do want to let you know in case you end up enjoying this dish in Japan and you won’t get caught off guard.

    So, in Japan, a lot of people dip the cooked ingredients in raw egg.  I know, I can almost hear “eww” from the some of my readers but that’s the fact.  I actually recommend you to try if you are in Japan where eggs are sometimes safe to consume raw.  The sweetness from raw egg coats well with salty vegetables and meat and it balances out the flavors very well.

    A white wooden bowl containing pasteurized brown eggs.

    Here in the U.S., raw eggs are not safe to eat, so purchase pasteurized eggs (they are actually hard to find) or you can pasteurize your eggs at home using sous vide method.

    Sukiyaki in a pot.

    I hope you enjoy making my Sukiyaki recipe!

    Don’t want to miss a recipe? Sign up for the FREE Just One Cookbook newsletter delivered to your inbox! And stay in touch with me on FacebookGoogle+Pinterest, and Instagram for all the latest updates.

    4.62 from 13 votes
    Sukiyaki (Japanese Hot Pot) | Easy Japanese Recipes at JustOneCookbook.com
    Sukiyaki
    Prep Time
    20 mins
    Cook Time
    10 mins
    Total Time
    30 mins
     
    Course: Main Course
    Servings: 4
    Author: Nami
    Ingredients
    Sukiyaki Sauce (Yield 2 ⅔ cup)
    • 1 cup sake (1 cup = 240 ml)
    • 1 cup mirin (1 cup = 240 ml)
    • ¼ cup sugar (¼ cup = 60 ml)
    • 1 cup soy sauce (1 cup = 240 ml)
    Instructions
    1. Gather all the ingredients.

      Sukiyaki Ingredients
    2. Combine 1 cup sake, 1 cup mirin, ¼ cup sugar, and 1 cup soy sauce in a small sauce pan and bring it to a boil. Once boiling, turn off the heat and set aside.
      Sukiyaki 1
    3. If your udon is frozen, cook it in boiling water until loosen. Remove from heat and soak in iced water to prevent overcooking them. Drain and transfer to a plate.
      Sukiyaki 2
    4. Prepare sukiyaki ingredients. Cut napa cabbage into 2” (5 cm) wide then cut in half right at the middle of the white part.
      Sukiyaki 3
    5. Cut shungiku into 2” (5 cm) wide, and slice Tokyo negi. Discard the bottom part of enoki and tear into smaller bundles.
      Sukiyaki 4
    6. Discard the shiitake stem and decorate the top of shiitake if you like.
      Sukiyaki 5
    7. Cut tofu into smaller pieces (I usually cut into 6-8 pieces).
      Sukiyaki 6
    8. If you like, you can slice some carrots and then stamp them into a floral shape for decoration.
      Sukiyaki 7
    9. Drain and rinse the shirataki noodles (sorry no photo). Put all the ingredients on one big platter for the table or into smaller individual servings.
      Sukiyaki 8
    10. Set a portable gas cook top at the dining table and heat a cast iron sukiyaki pot (or any pot) on medium heat. When it’s hot, add 1 Tbsp. cooking oil.
      Sukiyaki 9
    11. Place some of sliced beef to sear and sprinkle 1 Tbsp. brown sugar. Flip and cook the meat. You can pour a little bit of Sukiyaki Sauce over the meat and enjoy the sweet and nicely caramelized meat now, or continue to next step and eat it later.
      Sukiyaki 10
    12. Pour 1 ⅓ cup of Sukiyaki Sauce and 1 cup dashi (or water) in the pot, or until ⅔ of the ingredients are submerged in the sauce.
      Sukiyaki 11
    13. Place some of the ingredients in the pot (except for udon). Put the lid on and bring to a boil. Once boiling, turn the heat and simmer until the ingredients are cooked through.
      Sukiyaki 12
    14. Once the food is cooked, you can start enjoying them. Keep adding more ingredients and sauce as you eat from the pot. If the sauce is too salty, add dashi to dilute. If the vegetables diluted the sauce too much, then add more sukiyaki sauce.
    15. We usually end the sukiyaki meal with udon. When most of the ingredients have disappeared, add udon to the pot. Cook until heated through and enjoy.
    Recipe Notes

    How to slice your own meat: click here.

     

    As I mentioned in the post above, in Japan, we crack and beat an egg into an individual bowl. Dip the cooked sukiyaki ingredients in the raw egg and eat. The salty sukiyaki will taste mild after dipping the egg, and the egg also adds a slightly sweet taste that’s indescribable. It’s amazingly delicious!
    Here in the US, raw eggs are not recommended for consumption. Please skip unless you’re certain the egg in your area is safe to consume raw.

     

     

    Equipment you will need:

    I use a Japanese cast iron pot. I can’t find the same product on Amazon but here’s one and another one with a lid.

     

    Recipe by Namiko Chen of Just One Cookbook. All images and content on this site are copyright protected. Please do not use my images without my permission. If you’d like to share this recipe on your site, please re-write the recipe in your own words and link to this post as the original source. Thank you.

    Update: Each month 20% of proceeds from selling my eBook will go to charity.  For January 2015, I donated to International Rescue Committee.   Thank you so much for those who purchased my eBook!

    Just One Cookbook Essential Japanese Recipes ebook

     

    You Might Also Like...

  • Just One Cookbook: Essential Japanese Recipes

    Love Our Recipes?

    Leave A Comment

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

    What type of comment do you have?

    This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

    Discussion

  • ChefBlogDigest wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • Linda’s Yummies wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • Kath (My Funny Little Life) wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • Nancy wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • Rolf Zeijdel wrote:
  • Elsie Hui wrote:
  • Anna Garcia wrote:
  • Stephanie wrote:
  • Lillian wrote:
  • Delishhh wrote:
  • Angie wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • jennifer wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • I_Fortuna wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • mira wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • Derick wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • nancy wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • Sunny wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • kristoffer wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
      • kristoffer wrote:
        • Nami wrote:
  • Lizzy wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • Julie wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • Marie wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • sharon wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • Eha wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • Vanessa wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • [email protected] Taitai wrote:
  • Kitchen Belleicious wrote:
  • [email protected] Riffs wrote:
  • Maggie wrote:
  • Jennifer Cheek-Payan wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • Linda | Brunch with Joy wrote:
  • Kennedy wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
      • kennedy wrote:
        • Nami wrote:
  • Sissi wrote:
  • A_Boleyn wrote:
  • Choc Chip Uru wrote:
  • Hotly Spiced wrote:
  • Monica wrote:
  • Ella-HomeCookingAdventure wrote:
  • Raymund wrote:
  • Manju @ Manju’s Eating Delights wrote:
  • Kit wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • Bam’s Kitchen wrote:
  • Gourmet Getaways wrote:
  • Liz wrote:
  • Mi Vida en un Dulce wrote:
  • Stephanie wrote:
  • mjskitchen wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • Kelly wrote:
  • Sandra wrote:
  • Alice wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • lisa cabudol wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • [email protected] Chef wrote:
  • Elizabeth Ann Quirino @Mango_Queen wrote:
  • Dr. Winfred Winfield wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • Lyn wrote:
  • Jim Griscom wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • Madeline wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • Macie wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • jason wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
      • jason wrote:
        • Nami wrote:
  • Rita Ray wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • Yin wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
      • Yin wrote:
  • Nadiah wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
      • Nadiah wrote:
  • Phil wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • SYLVIE wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • Kenken wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
      • Kenken wrote:
  • chris wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • AbominableDROman wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • Seira wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • Anna wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • Claudia wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • Jessica wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • Tina wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • Fool for food wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • Katie wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • Ki wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • Britt wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
      • Britt wrote:
        • Nami wrote:
  • Billy wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • Jane wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • Sean aka @hapahaoleboy on IG wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • Julie wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • Loree wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • Kuni Katsuya wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • Elissa wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • Kristen wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • Linda wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • Aubrey wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • Sarah R wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • Amanda B. wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • Alice wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • Jamie Kotsubo wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • Kristin wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • Apple girl wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • Caro wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • Viola wrote:
    • Nami wrote:
  • Greyson wrote:
    • Nami wrote: